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New Media @ Columbia

New Media has been offered at Columbia's J-school since September 1994. First course, Cyberspace Reporting, was taught by Josh Quittner of Time. First New Media Workshop site launched in April 1995 using Netscape version 0.9.

Since then we have offered three kinds of courses to hundreds of students:

  • New Media Workshop for new media majors (~ 18 a year)
  • New Media Master's Projects for new media majors (~ 6 a year)
  • New Media Skills for print and broadcast students - building a basic online portfolio, learning Dreamweaver and Photoshop

Non-New Media Majors Taking New Media Skills:
Late 1990s = 48
2005 = 64
2006 = 96
2007 = 120
2008 = 192 (expected)

In 2007-08, we have two new brand-new efforts:

  • New Media Newsroom Elective (for majors and non-majors); 36 students
  • Web-ified RWI (new media skills in all classes); 240 students

NEW MEDIA OFFERINGS 2007-08
draft - subject to change

SUMMER 2007
 
May RWI: Web-ified RWI (including FatWire CMS/content management system) 
Faculty: Duy Linh Tu, Russell Chun

August 6-15: New Media Prep for New Media majors (eight days of intensive, hands-on software and hardware + scene setting lectures)
Faculty: Sree Sreenivasan (coordinator) + Duy Linh Tu, Russell Chun

FALL 2007

New Media Newsroom: New 3-credit elective course
Students create multimedia stories combining reportage and web production
Two sections, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Wednesdays and Thursdays
FACULTY: Sree Sreenivasan (coordinator) + Sig Gissler, Steve Isaacs, Duy Linh Tu, Russell Chun

Web-ified RWI (including FatWire training): Introduction of new media skill-set and mind-set in all 13 RWI sections
See course description below.
Faculty: Sree Sreenivasan (coordinator) + Duy Linh Tu, Russell Chun

New Media Master's Projects
Fall and Spring - upto 10 teams (up from six in 2007)
FACULTY: Sree Sreenivasan & Russell Chun

New Media Skills for print and broadcast students
Three for Broadcasters
Five for Print/MA
FACULTY: Russell Chun, Michael Cervieri

SPRING 2008

New Media Skills
Four sections
FACULTY: Michael Cervieri, other

New Media Master's Projects - cont'd from Fall

New Media Elective for print and broadcast students
Intermediate new media production class
FACULTY: Jennifer Johnson

New Media Workshop for new media majors
Advanced production class - NYC24.org
FACULTY: Duy Lihn Tu, Jeff Gralnick, Carla Baranauckus

PROPOSED - New Media Workshop - EMBEDDED
Teams of 2-3 new media majors work in radio, Nightly, 801, Bronx Beat, CNS - true convergence journalism
FACULTY: Sree Sreenivasan & Russell Chun

o o o o o

WEB-IFIED RWI
Version 1.0 - DRAFT - watch for changes

What we'd like to introduce into RWI, starting Fall 2007, with four two-hour sessions of training from Duy & Russell.

 * FATWIRE TRAINING: Learning the FatWire CMS can take anywhere between one and three hours, so it will be interspersed with the teaching of the other skills below.
 
* CONTINUOUS NEWS SKILLS: At least [5] day-of assignments should require students to file: Within an hour of arriving on the scene, a 10-word brief; followed, within a couple of hours, by a 100-word story with updated info; and, finally, the full 800-1,000-word story by 5 p.m.

* HYPERLINKS: Every assignment should require students to submit, at the end, a list of online resources that help the reader get a better understanding of the story. They can be links to PDF reports, websites with more info or just the official sites of the institutions in the story. If the students turn in copy via Word, the hyperlinks should be built into the text. Knowing what parts of sentences to link FROM is as useful a skill as knowing what to link TO.

* PHOTOGRAPHS: At least [5] assignments should require students to submit 3-5 photos - whether by cellphone or a school camera. The megapixels of the photographs don't matter - it's how they are framed and what they capture.

* AUDIO: At least [1] assignment should require students to submit an audio file, cut down (not finely edited) to, say, 3-5 minutes. This might be an interview with a major character; sounds from the protest, etc.

* {OPTIONAL, AT PROFESSOR'S DISCRETION}
VIDEO: At least [1] assignment should require students to submit a video filed, cut down to, say, 3-5 minutes. Could be video of the scene, eg.

 

 

 

 

sree.net > teaching > new media @ columbia